Submissions Flash Fiction Stories Novel Excerpts Poetry Stretching Forms Creative Non-Fiction Reviews Interviews Staff Links Word Riot Press
 
Updates



Links
    3:AM Magazine
    Better Non Sequitur
    Brian Ames
    David Barringer
    Future Tense Publishing
    Jackie Corley
    Pequin
    Scott Bateman
    So New Publishing
...more links

Advertisements
Advertise with us
Thank You for Your Submission
by Thom Didato


A Writer - Editor Email Exchange

To: submissions@theriverheadreview.org
From: Ann Marie RXXXXXX
Date: 12/12/97
Subject: request for submission guidelines

Dear Editors:

I am emailing to obtain your submission guidelines for poetry. I have long been an avid reader of The RiverHead Review and appreciate the literary effort you and your colleagues continue to publish. Coincidentally, I am also an accomplished poet, having been published in such periodicals as Tumwater Times, The Angry Wench, and Bitch Factor.

I thank you for your timely response to this request, and again commend you on publishing such a worthwhile journal.

Sincerely,

Ann Marie RXXXXXX
XXX XXth Street
New York, NY, XXXXX
(212) XXX-XXXX

~


To: Ann Marie RXXXXXX
From: editors@theriverheadreview.org
Date: 01/02/98
Subject: RE: request for submission guidelines

Dear Ann Marie:

Our submission guidelines for poetry are as follows:

Poetry: Please submit three to five previously unpublished poems. The RiverHead Review acquires exclusive first North American rights. Works will also be archived online. All other rights revert to the artist. Submissions are accepted year round. Simultaneous submissions are OK, if noted. Remuneration: TRR pays $100 per poem and provides all contributors with 5 complimentary copies of the issue upon publication.

Per your request, I have also enclosed a copy of our complete submission guidelines, which are available on the back of the masthead page in every issue, and appear on our website (www.theriverheadreview.org).

On behalf of all my colleagues here at TRR, I thank you for your kind words about our journal and hope to have the opportunity to read your work in the near future.

Sincerely,

T.N. Didato
Editor, The RiverHead Review

Attached: Submission Guidelines (MS-Word Doc)

~


To: submissions@theriverheadreview.org
From: Ann Marie RXXXXXX
Date: 01/18/98
Subject: Alone Out Here

Dear Mr. Didato:

Thank you for emailing me your submission guidelines. Below is a copy of my poem, "Alone Out Here" for your consideration. It's about my feelings of seclusion during a recent detainment at the State Psychiatric Ward.

I am an accomplished poet, whose publishing credits include works in Tumwater Times, The Angry Wench and Bitch Factor. I received my MFA from Iowa Writer's Workshop and was recipient of the Anne Sexton Fellowship for poets.

So, here's my latest greatest work.

Sincerely,

Ann Marie RXXXXXX

PS - Note: This is a simultaneous submissions, and I'm offering it to publications on a first come first serve basis, so please make up you mind fast!


All Alone Out Here

On the edge of the Earth,
by the shore of the sea.
At the summit of Mt. Everest,
that's where you'll find me.

Circumambulating the circumference,
far above the atmosphere.
Beyond the border of Bolivia,
You will find me there.

Along the periphery of the schoolyard,
An outsider longing to be free.
Never have the courage to go beyond these padded walls,
Only hope you will have the strength to find me.

Copyright by Ann Marie RXXXXXX

~


To: Ann Marie RXXXXXX
From: editors@theriverheadreview.org
Date: 02/16/98
Subject: RE: Alone Out Here

Dear Ann Marie:

On behalf of my colleagues here at TRR, I want to thank you for submitting your poetry and giving us the opportunity to read your work. Unfortunately, after careful review, we have decided against publishing "All Alone Out Here" in our next issue.

While it is clear that you are an accomplished poet, our poetry editors did not care for the simple rhyme scheme of this particular poem. Furthermore, we found the images in "All Alone…" to be both emotionally and pictorially stereotypical. We did believe that by the third stanza, the real idea and opportunity for unique personal observation was starting to surface. But as one of my colleagues said, "The universal quality of this poem could be better served should the poet care to really put her unique personal experience at the psych ward to the test."

Though we are not accepting this poem, you should know that we are intrigued by your work to hope to have the opportunity to read more of it. Please note, however, should you care to resubmit more of your poetry, in accordance with the submission guidelines, please send us 3-5 poems so that we may better judge the style and substance of your writing.

Again, I thank you for submitting and hope to hear from you again in the future.

Sincerely,

T.N. Didato
Editor, The RiverHead Review

~


To: submissions@theriverheadreview.org
From: Ann Marie RXXXXXX
Date: 02/28/98
Subject: Ward of the State - unique yet universal poetry submission

Dear T.N.:

While I whole-heartily disagree with your and your colleagues' assessment of my work, I was encouraged that you'd like to see more of it. Consequently, enclosed please find "Ward of the State" - a truly unique personal poem with universal meaning.

Awaiting your approval,

Ann Marie RXXXXXX

Ann Marie RXXXXXX is an accomplished poet, whose publishing credits include works in Tumwater Times, The Angry Wench, and Bitch Factor. She received her MFA from the prestigious Iowa Writer's Workshop and was recipient of the Anne Sexton Fellowship for poets.


Ward Of The State

I am a ward of the State.
Don't get in trouble if I stay up late.
Eat my dinners with no fork
Just plate.

I hear a sink somewhere off in the distance
Drip
Drip Drip
Drip
Drip Drip

Too late
I've long since slipped.

I am a ward of the State.

Copyright by Ann Marie RXXXXXX

~


To: Ann Marie RXXXXXX
From: editors@theriverheadreview.org
Date: 04/24/98
Subject: RE: Ward of the State - unique yet universal poetry submission

Dear Ann Marie:

First of all, my apologies for not having responded sooner to your poetry submission, we here at TRR have been inundated with submissions of late and are taking a longer period of time to read and review them all. And while I once again would like to thank you for submitting your work, unfortunately I have the same response as before.

My colleagues and I are intrigued by the potential of a poem like, "Ward Of The State," but in this case we don't feel that the poem lives up to such potential. Again, we felt as if the imagery you employ is generic, and believe that both thematically and substantively the idea(s) behind this poem could be developed much further. In all honesty, we couldn't determine your use of the dripping faucet was supposed to be intentionally humorous or just a tired metaphor.

I realize that the above commentary my be harsh, but we here at the TRR believe it's better for both parties involved that we give each submitter our honest response to their work, rather than a mere non-personal standard rejection.

Sincerely,

T.N. Didato
Editor - The RiverHead Review

~


To: submissions@theriverheadreview.org
From: Ann Marie RXXXXXX
Date: 05/01/98
Subject: RE: Ward of the State - unique yet universal poetry submission

T.N.:

Not only did I find your letter to be extremely harsh but the words you use are cruel and simply downright mean. Furthermore, I find TRR's policy of asking poets to submit 3-5 poems at a time to be unwarranted. If you and your colleagues cannot judge a writer's work on a poem-by-poem basis, then might I suggest that you are in the wrong business!

I would love to have the opportunity to discuss this in person, should you be brave enough to accept a little "constructive" criticism of your own. My phone number is listed below-should you be so bold.

Ann Marie RXXXXXX

XXX XXth Street
New York, NY, XXXXX
(212) XXX-XXXX

PS - FYI… My poem "All Alone Out Here" just received some positive comments by the editorial board of the Paris Review.

~


To: submissions@theriverheadreview.org
From: Ann Marie RXXXXXX
Date: 06/19/98
Subject: one more chance… New Beginnings

Editors -

Though I was disappointed not receiving a reply to my last correspondence, I have decided to give you all one more chance to consider my poetry. Enclosed please find, "New Beginnings" which previously appeared in the January 1994 issue of Bitch Factor. I offer it in hopes to find a new audience for an old work.

A prompt response would be appreciated.

Ann Marie RXXXXXX

Ann Marie RXXXXXX is an accomplished poet, whose publishing credits include works in Tumwater Times, The Angry Wench, and Bitch Factor. She currently has work under consideration at The Paris Review, Ploughshares, Agni, and The New Yorker. She received her MFA from the prestigious Iowa Writer's Workshop and was recipient of the Anne Sexton Fellowship for poets.


New Beginnings

Like that stain in my panties.
Like a leaf falling from a tree.
As a rock turns to sand.
My flower opens for thee.

When wind hits first sail.
When Mama's lipstick is applied.
You recall your lips on a third grader
Or at Aunt Elsie's where you first lied.

But the end fast approaches
But the conclusion comes near.
I will wish you a new beginning
Forgotten be those years.

Copyright by Ann Marie RXXXXXX

~


To: Ann Marie RXXXXXX
From: editors@theriverheadreview.org
Date: 08/24/98
Subject: RE: one more chance… New Beginnings

Ann Marie:

Once again, on behalf of everyone here at TRR, I want to thank you for submitting your poetry. Nevertheless, we will also pass on publishing "New Beginnings."

At the risk of being cruel, I will give you three reasons why our poetry editors passed on publishing your latest submission: First and foremost, as stated in our submission guidelines, TRR only considers previous unpublished material (though, I must confess, we are unfamiliar with the publication, Bitch Factor); secondly, "New Beginnings" suffers from the similar simple rhyming scheme that our editors did not care for in your earlier submission; and lastly, we here at TRR have an unwritten in-house style rule that eliminates poems that employ either the word "panty / panties" or utilize the image of a leaf falling from a tree-"New Beginnings" uses both within the first two lines.

Ann, I realize that is must be frustrating to keep getting the same negative response from us, and perhaps, having now read several of your poems, we are simply dealing with a difference in style preferences rather than anything substantive. We are happy to hear that you have received some encouraging feedback from the Paris Review and we know that these poems are under consideration elsewhere. We hope that each will soon find a home.

Sincerely,

T.N. Didato
Editor, The RiverHead Review

~


To: submissions@theriverheadreview.org
From: Ann Marie RXXXXXX
Date: 09/11/98
Subject: another… poetry submission

To Whom It May Concern:

For your information, "New Beginnings" is very similar in style and substance to a rather famous poet! I am seriously beginning to wonder whether you would recognize a great poem if you ever read one. Perhaps, the enclosed untitled poem is more to your style…

Ann Marie RXXXXXX

Ann Marie RXXXXXX is an accomplished poet, whose publishing credits include works in Tumwater Times, The Angry Wench, and Bitch Factor. She currently has work under consideration at Ploughshares, Agni, and The New Yorker. She received her MFA from the prestigious Iowa Writer's Workshop and was recipient of the Anne Sexton Fellowship for poets.


Untitled…

Call the roller of big cigars,
The muscular one, and bid him whip
In kitchen cups concupiscent curds.
Let the wrenches dawdle in such dress
As they are used to wear, and let the boys
Bring flowers in last month's newspapers.
Let be be finale of seem.
The only emperor is the emperor of ice cream.

Take from the dresser of deal,
Lacking three glass knobs, that sheet
On which she embroidered fantails once
And spread it so as to cover her face.
If her horny feet protrude, they come
To show how cold she is, and dumb.
Let the lamp affix its beam.
The only emperor is the emperor of ice-cream.

~


To: Ann Marie RXXXXXX
From: editors@theriverheadreview.org
Date: 11/02/98
Subject: RE: another… poetry submission

Dear Ann Marie:

Wow! What can I say? Your latest submission is head and heals above your earlier works, both stylistically and substantively. Our editorial board met last evening and I can honestly say everyone loved this poem! Accolades all around. Unlike the generic imagery and adolescent rhyme schemes of those earlier submissions, this poem aptly brings together highly personal and original observations, unique language alliterations, all the while exposing the universal commonality of the concept of death.

Indeed, our poetry editors loved the images created here, and would like to include the poem in our next issue. That said, however, one of my colleague's has questioned the authorship of this poem, and after a reference check, we were disappointed to discover that this poem is not your own.

For future reference, when attempting to publish plagiarized works you may want to: (1) not select a famous poem by an even more famous poet like Wallace Stevens; and (2) not use a poem where the original title is contained within the text of the work.

If you happen to actually write anything remotely close to the quality and originality of a poem like "The Emperor of Ice-Cream" please feel free to submit, if not, I can only wish you the best of luck placing your work (or the work of another) elsewhere.

Sincerely,

T.N. Didato
Editor, The RiverHead Review

~


To: submissions@theriverheadreview.org
From: Ann Marie RXXXXXX
Date: 11/03/98
Subject: RE: another… poetry submission

Dear T.N.:

What can I say? Touch? You and your colleagues passed the test. It's only a shame that I'm not already dead and famous, that way, I'd be sure to be published in The RiverHead Review.

Ann Marie Robitalle

~


To: submissions@theriverheadreview.org
From: Ann Marie RXXXXXX
Date: 11/2/98
Subject : poetry submission

Dear Poetry Editor:

Per The RiverHead Review guidelines, enclosed please find three poems: In Memoriam for Mother, Ode to Odelay, and Table and Chairs, submitted for your consideration. As a long time reader of TRR, I would welcome any comments you and your colleagues' may have of my work.

Sincerely,

A.M.R.

A.M.R. is a graduate of the Iowa Writer's Workshop. A recipient of the Anne Sexton Fellowship, her poetry has appeared in many journals and magazines.


In Memoriam for Mother

I do not see you
Lying there
Cold and alone
Freed from care

I'll remember your face
That smile, that stare
Handing me my lunch bucket
As I race down the stairs

I'll recall your mending
My scraped knees and head
Forgiving of my failures
A kiss upon my forehead

But will those memories fade me?
Must they end with this fate?
To be left holding the memory
Of you lying in this state.


Ode to Odelay

Here comes the man, a closet-faced clown.
An exaggerated expression, red lips, white face.
He scares me mommy. His smile seems sick.
And that pitch he is screaming, a cantankerous cord at play
Still rings in my ears, make less sense each passing day
The Ode to whatever…
That Ode to Odelay.

Table and Chairs

One table
Twelve chairs
Makes one wonder
Who sat there

Twelve chairs
Surround one table
Gathering for the feast
Come one, come able.

One table
Twelve chairs
All made of polished dead wood
All just sit… and stare.

~


To: Ann Marie RXXXXXX
From: editors@theriverheadreview.org
Date: 12/17/98
Subject: RE: poetry submission

Dear Writer:

Thank you for your submission. Unfortunately, it does not meet our editorial needs. We apologize for the impersonal nature of this form letter, and wish you the best of luck placing your work elsewhere.

Sincerely,

The Editors
The RiverHead Review



About the author:
Thom Didato is one of the founding editors of the literary journal, failbetter.com. His most recent fiction credits can be seen in recent issues of Pig Iron Malt and Tatlin’s Tower, as well as in the forthcoming Spring 2003 issue of Gargoyle. A 2002 Edward F. Albee Fellow for Fiction, Thom lives in Brooklyn, New York.



© 2011 Word Riot

Advertisements
Advertise with us

Midnight Picnic
a novel by
Nick Antosca

___________

The Suburban Swindle


More about The Suburban Swindle
___________