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Grace Paley | Word Riot
Blog | February 10, 2016

Notes From Elsewhere: WR Author Updates, Awesome Women + More

Greetings, Rioters! I’ve decided my bookmark folder containing links for you all needs a good clear-out, so let’s have a few days’ worth Note From Elsewhere goodness, shall we? YES! Time to catch up.

First up, we have a shedload of WR Author Updates that I’ve neglected to tell you about:

Logen Cure, whose poem “These Are My Best Gifts” first appeared here, now has a full chapbook out called Still.

Previously seen here reviewing Philip Glass’ Einstein on The Beach, Fred Skolnik has a new novel, Death.

Katie Cortese has a collection of flash fiction out, Girl Power and Other Short-Short Stories. Her story “Disappearing Act”

Blog | October 24, 2014

Notes From Elsewhere: Small Press News, Feminist Reading + More

We have a lot of kick-ass ladies and reading suggestions in this Notes From Elsewhere, so let’s get to it, and then you can go back to sorting your Halloween plans.

Speaking of Halloween, would you like some spooooooky stories to read? Emily Temple at Flavorwire has a shedload for you.

Also at Flavorwire: 28 Feminist Writers on Books Every Man Should Read. (Also, people in general, I would venture.)

And from Alison Herman: “‘Women as Supporting Characters Is a Problem:’ NY Comic Con Panels Take on Strong Female Characters and Trans Themes.”

And speaking of writing about women, let me squeeze in another mention of my favorite

Blog | May 11, 2012

Notes From Elsewhere: A Word Riot Roundup

(Notes From Elsewhere is a roundup of various literary things compiled by Sara Habein, along with news from past Word Riot authors. She make no claims at being terribly current or the first to know anything, but hopefully you will find something interesting here.)

This week, in Paris Review archives: This 1992 interview with Grace Paley.

INTERVIEWER

What is the relationship between writing and money?

PALEY

It’s helpful to have money. I don’t think writers have to suffer to starve to death. One of the first things I tell my classes is, If you want to write, keep a low overhead.